Parliamentary breakfast with the Bundestag's transportation committee concerning the revision driving licence law.

19.05.2017
The TIV board, together with the chairman of the German Federal Association of Driver Training Associations on 19 May.
The TIV board, together with the chairman of the German Federal Association of Driver Training Associations on 19 May.

The complex driving licence regulations in the EU are unsettling and not just disadvantageous for our industry. Against the backdrop of a parliamentary breakfast with members of the Transport Committee in the German Bundestag, the Executive Board was able to present the positions of the TIV.

On 19 May, the TIV board, together with the chairman of the German Federal Association of Driver Training Associations (BVF), Kurt Bartels, highlighted the problems of the complexity of driving licences in Germany. Member of the German Bundestag (MdB) Gero Storjohann from the CDU / CSU faction in the German Bundestag, who had arranged the meeting at the request of the TIV board, was convinced, as were the other participants of the transportation committee, following the meeting, stating: "The variety of driving licences permit people to drive vehicles with trailers needs to be revised."

In cooperation with the authorities and legislators, the association particularly wants to contribute towards safe, but also user-friendly developments of the EU regulations that relate to driving licences. Member of the Board Dr. Uwe Meyer stated: "The current European driving licence legislation makes the use of a practical, inexpensive and environmentally friendly means of transport more difficult and threatens many jobs at SMEs, especially in Germany. It is therefore our goal to work towards a reform of the complex rules."

As a result of the meeting a letter was produced to be sent to the Federal Ministry of Transport, which calls for the reform of EU driving licence law in the new legislative term. Accordingly at the request of the TIV, the driving licence law with five classes, in the form that it existed up to and including 1998, should ideally be restored.

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